Lyndon B. Johnson National Grassland NEON (CLBJ) Soil Descriptions

Pedon Descriptions

Pit‐level observations and field measurements reported using the standard NRCS format. They contain volume estimates for coarse fragments > 20 mm where applicable.

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Site Level Plot Summary

A narrative summary that places the sampled soil pedons in the broader context of soils and geomorphology for the entire NEON site.

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soil profile

D11 CLBJ megapit soil profile 0-140 cm

soil profile

D11 CLBJ megapit soil profile 0-25 cm

soil profile

D11 CLBJ megapit soil profile 15-38 cm

soil profile

D11 CLBJ megapit soil profile 38-83 cm

soil profile

D11 CLBJ megapit soil profile 69-92 cm

soil profile

D11 CLBJ megapit soil profile 90-119 cm

soil profile

D11 CLBJ megapit soil profile 97-137 cm

Megapit Pedon Description

Print Date Feb 7 2018
Description Date May 9 2016
Describer Sidney Paulson
Site ID S2016TX497001_MP
Site Note Site of NEON Megapit at the LBJ National Grasslands.
Pedon ID S2016TX497001
Lab Source ID KSSL
Lab Pedon # 16N0686
Soil Name as Described/Sampled Windthorst
Classification Fine, mixed, active, thermic Udic Paleustalfs
Pedon Type correlates to named soil
Pedon Purpose research site
Taxon Kind series
Physiographic Division Interior Plains
Physiographic Province Central Lowland Province
Geomorphic Setting on backslope of side slope of ridge on hill
Upslope Shape linear
Cross Slope Shape linear
Particle Size Control Section 34 to 84 cm.
Description origin NASIS
State Texas
County Wise
MLRA 84B -- West Cross Timbers
Soil Survey Area TX497 -- Wise County, Texas
Map Unit WeC -- Duffau-Windthorst complex, 1 to 5 percent slopes, moderately eroded
Quad Name New Harp, Texas
Std Latitude 33.4014300
Std Longitude -97.5672500
Latitude 33 degrees 24 minutes 5.14 seconds north
Longitude 97 degrees 34 minutes 2.10 seconds west
Datum WGS84
UTM Zone 14
UTM Easting 633238 meters
UTM Northing 3696708 meters
Primary Earth Cover Grass/herbaceous cover
Secondary Earth Cover Savanna rangeland
Existing Vegetation cedar elm, eastern redcedar, post oak, saw greenbrier
Parent Material loamy and/or clayey residuum weathered from sandstone
Bedrock Kind sandstone
Bedrock Depth 122 centimeters
Bedrock Hardness noncemented
Bedrock Fracture Interval 10 to less than 45 centimeters
Description database KSSL
Diagnostic Features ochric epipedon 0 to 34 cm.
argillic horizon 34 to 122 cm.
densic contact 122 to cm.
densic materials 122 to 152 cm.
Top Depth (cm) 122
Bottom Depth (cm) 152
Restriction Kind bedrock, densic
Restriction Hardness noncemented
Slope (%) 4.0
Elevation (meters) 274.3
Aspect (deg) 150
Drainage Class moderately well
Horizon Details

A--0 to 21 centimeters (0.0 to 8.3 inches); brown (7.5YR 5/3) fine sandy loam, brown (7.5YR 4/3), moist; 15 percent clay; moderate fine subangular blocky, and moderate medium subangular blocky structure; slightly hard, very friable, noncemented, nonsticky, nonplastic; many very fine roots throughout and common medium roots throughout and many fine roots throughout and common coarse roots throughout; common fine high-continuity irregular pores; noneffervescent, by HCl, 1 normal; clear smooth boundary. Lab sample # 16N03043

E--21 to 34 centimeters (8.3 to 13.4 inches); pink (7.5YR 7/3) fine sandy loam, light brown (7.5YR 6/3), moist; 10 percent clay; moderate fine subangular blocky, and moderate medium subangular blocky structure; slightly hard, very friable, noncemented, nonsticky, nonplastic; common very fine roots throughout and common medium roots throughout and many fine roots throughout; common fine high-continuity irregular pores; noneffervescent, by HCl, 1 normal; clear smooth boundary. Lab sample # 16N03044

Bt1--34 to 71 centimeters (13.4 to 28.0 inches); red (2.5YR 5/8) clay, red (2.5YR 4/8), moist; 44 percent clay; moderate medium prismatic parts to moderate medium angular blocky structure; very hard, firm, noncemented, moderately sticky, moderately plastic; common very fine roots throughout and common medium roots throughout and many fine roots throughout; common fine high-continuity dendritic tubular pores; 80 percent distinct clay films on all faces of peds; noneffervescent, by HCl, 1 normal; gradual smooth boundary. Lab sample # 16N03045

Bt2--71 to 89 centimeters (28.0 to 35.0 inches); red (2.5YR 5/8) sandy clay, red (2.5YR 4/8), moist; 37 percent clay; moderate medium prismatic parts to moderate medium angular blocky structure; very hard, firm, noncemented, moderately sticky, moderately plastic; common very fine roots throughout and common medium roots throughout and common fine roots throughout; 60 percent distinct clay films on all faces of peds; 1 percent very fine distinct irregular extremely weakly cemented 7.5YR 2.5/1), moist, iron-manganese concretions with clear boundaries throughout; noneffervescent, by HCl, 1 normal; clear smooth boundary. Lab sample # 16N03046

Bt3--89 to 122 centimeters (35.0 to 48.0 inches); pale brown (10YR 6/3) sandy clay loam, pale brown (10YR 6/3), moist; 32 percent clay; weak medium prismatic parts to moderate medium angular blocky structure; hard, firm, noncemented, slightly sticky, slightly plastic; common medium roots throughout and common fine roots throughout; 20 percent distinct clay films on all faces of peds; 1 percent very fine distinct irregular extremely weakly cemented 7.5YR 2.5/1), moist, iron-manganese concretions with clear boundaries throughout and 40 percent medium prominent irregular 5YR 6/8), moist, masses of oxidized iron with clear boundaries throughout; noneffervescent, by HCl, 1 normal; abrupt smooth boundary. Lab sample # 16N03047

Cd--122 to 152 centimeters (48.0 to 59.8 inches); very pale brown (10YR 8/2) loamy very fine sand, light gray (10YR 7/2), moist; 6 percent clay; massive; noncemented; common medium roots in cracks; noneffervescent, by HCl, 1 normal; Dark organic stains are present along root channels in the cracks and fracture planes of the lower part of this layer. Lab sample # 16N03048.

Credits: This megapit soil pedon description was generously created by USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service staff, with particular thanks to Larry West, Jon Hempel, and numerous field staff.